Only 2.21% of Indian graduating computer programmers can write correct code

    According to a 2017 skills assessment of graduating Indian software engineers conducted by Aspiring Minds, an Indian skills assessment company, only 2.21% of the candidates are able to write functionally and logically correct code. The report is based on surveying 36,800 students from 500+ colleges across India which included 61.1% males and 38.9% females.




    The key findings of the National Programming Skills Report on graduating Indian computer programmers are as follows:

    • As low as 2.21% engineers possess the skill to write a fully functional code with best efficiency and writing practices.
    • Out of the 2 problems given per candidate, only 14% engineers are able to write compilable codes for both and only 22% write compilable code for exactly one problem.
    • Only 14.67% engineers are employable for IT Services company. While only 2.47% are observed to be employable in IT Product company.
    • 2.56% candidates are able to write functionally correct code with few anomalies.
    • 31.01% candidates are not able to write functionally correct code.
    • 64.22% candidates are not able to write compilable code.

    The coding capability of graduating Indian computer programming engineers need substantial improvements if they want to continue exporting their top IT talent to US and other countries. Despite the high growth rate in jobs in software/IT sectors, there is an urgent need of hiring qualified talent for US corporations. Do we hire overseas “talent” or put our Millennials and unemployed back to work?

    Origin countries of H-1B visa recipients in 2016

    This chart below shows origin countries of H-1B visa recipients in 2016.

    Infographic: India & China Accounted For 82% Of H-1B Visas In 2016 | Statista

    What is shocking is that in 2016, 82 percent of all H-1B visas were issued to recipients from India and China. 126,692 were from India.

    Do we really want to hire someone from overseas who can’t hardly write usable programming code working in our infrastructure networks, IT departments and government positions?




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